MD Anderson Cancer Center at Cooper – CyberKnife® Treats 1000th Patient

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L – R: Patrick Lai, Radiation Therapist; Barbara Stein, 1000th patient; Anna Lawson, Lead Radiation Therapist; Ashish Patel, MD, Radiation Oncologist

The MD Anderson Cancer Center at Cooper – CyberKnife® team recently treated its 1000th patient, Mrs. Barbara Stein. Mrs. Stein, a resident of Gladwyne, PA, was diagnosed with early stage lung cancer and received four CyberKnife treatments – the only treatment she will need for her cancer.

Since opening in 2008, the center has drawn patients from southern New Jersey, western Pennsylvania, Delaware and even as far as Florida.

“Reaching this milestone in patient care is a proud moment for our program,” says Generosa Grana, MD. “It is a testament to the experience and expertise of our team.”

Dr. Grana says, “CyberKnife represents the most precise technology in radiation therapy today, with excellent outcomes and minimal side effects. We are honored by the patients who choose us for their care, and we look forward to helping the next 1,000 patients face the challenge of their cancers.”

CyberKnife robotic technology provides stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). During these procedures, precisely targeted, high-dose radiation beams are delivered to tumors throughout the body without sedation or incision while radiation exposure to healthy tissue around a tumor is minimized.

Tumors and lesions treated using CyberKnife technology include brain, lung, liver, pancreas, prostate, spine and pelvic tumors. In addition to these primary sites, other cancer sites may be eligible for CyberKnife treatment, depending on the specific medical condition of a patient and the recommendation of their physician.

Clinical data has shown SRS/SBRT to be an effective treatment for inoperable and high-risk patients with primary or metastatic tumors, or tumors located close to critical organs or in areas of the body that were previously irradiated.

More than one-third of MD Anderson Cooper CyberKnife patients have been treated for lung cancer since the program’s inception. Over the last two years, that number has risen to 50 percent.

MD Anderson Cooper CyberKnife  services are provided in our dedicated facility in Mount Laurel, NJ.

Media contact:
Wendy A. Marano
marano-wendy@cooperhealth.edu
Office: 856.382.6463
Mobile: 856-904-1688

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Cooper University Hospital First in New Jersey to Earn Premier Certification for Geriatric Fracture Care

geriatricfractureCooper University Hospital is the first in New Jersey and one of only eight hospitals in the nation to achieve the International Geriatric Fracture Society’s (IGFS) Premier Level CORE Certification for its Geriatric Fracture Care Program. This certification recognizes health care organizations that display a commitment to improving the way fractures in senior adults are managed from prevention efforts through treatment, recovery and beyond.

“We are thrilled to be recognized for our efforts in establishing a program that fosters a team-oriented approach and embraces evidence-based principles unique to this patient population,” said Douglas S. Tase, MD, joint replacement surgeon of the Cooper Bone and Joint Institute. “Since our program started, it has improved outcomes and quality of life for our senior patients by providing a higher-standard of specialized services.”

The CORE Certification Program is a global quality improvement initiative designed to recognize the achievements of geriatric fracture programs that exceed outcomes benchmarks in the management of elderly and fragility fractures. The CORE Certification relies on several key quality indicators such as time to surgery, readmission rates, mortality and osteoporosis education. It was developed by an IGFS team of experts representing thought-leaders in Asia, Europe, North America and South America to recognize achievements of geriatric fracture care programs delivering the highest quality care to this patient population.

“All of their hard work and efforts were clearly demonstrated in the care they render and the outcomes they have achieved. I look forward to working with the Cooper team to drive continued performance improvement through this initiative,” said IGFS Certification Specialist, Teresa K. Swenson, BSH, CCRP, RT(R)(CT)(ARRT), Director of Research and Clinical Operations for Geisinger Health System in Danville, PA.

Media contact:
Wendy A. Marano
marano-wendy@cooperhealth.edu
Office: 856.382.6463
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Thirty Cancer Patients Embark on Pilot Study Using Apple Watch

Polaris Health Directions and MD Anderson Cancer Center at Cooper Leverage Wearable Technology to emPOWER a New Generation of Support for Breast Cancer Patients

AppleSport_Pink_FaceThirty breast cancer patients at MD Anderson Cancer Center at Cooper are taking part in an integrated medical-behavioral health pilot project, using the Apple Watch to capture behavioral data that could affect the courses and outcomes of treatment for breast cancer patients.

The project, which was launched at a December 1, 2015, event, is a joint effort between MD Anderson Cooper and behavioral health technology company Polaris Health Directions of Wayne, Pa. The study will combine wearable technology with Polaris’s Polestar™ behavioral health outcomes management (BHOM) platform – a proprietary, advanced technology that captures and analyzes data to provide meaningful, actionable reporting for monitoring treatment progress and intervening, as necessary, throughout the continuum of care.

“The impact of the integration of behavioral health in cancer care is significant; a positive frame of mind can help patients through all phases of their diagnosis and treatment,” said Generosa Grana, MD, FACP, Director of the MD Anderson Cancer Center at Cooper. “Patient engagement is a critical factor in successful treatment plans. We expect that this pilot project using the Apple Watch will help us collect important data that will only increase patient engagement. Ultimately, this data collection will benefit the patients by allowing us to refine their treatment plans even more.”

The patients taking part in the study received a customized Apple Watch and hands-on training at the kick-off event. Using Polaris’s emPOWER app, which functions mutually through the Apple Watch and iPhone, patients were trained on how to record their experiences and discover more about their own mindset. They also learned how to use the app to connect to other cancer patients, and reach out in real-time to both their care team and other members of their patient cohort for both clinical and social support.

The emPOWER app monitors patients’ behavioral data such as treatment side effects, sleep information, physical activity levels, patient mood and other measurable information captured through the Apple Watch. By collecting and analyzing pertinent behavioral data, one of the app’s central goals is to improve quality of life for cancer patients. It leverages Apple’s robust iOS HealthKit API to access relevant patient physical health metrics that are used in correlation with behavioral data collected via the Apple Watch and iPhone apps to improve patient outcomes.

“Technology has the rare ability to transform human connectedness, understanding and quality of life,” says Mark Anthony, Chief Executive Officer of Polaris. “We believe technology, brought together with our behavioral health expertise, has the power to touch and transform lives — in this case, the lives of 30 women who are currently undergoing breast cancer treatment.”

According to Cori McMahon, PsyD, Director of Behavioral Medicine at MD Anderson Cancer Center at Cooper, adjustments to lifestyle changes and uncertainty are among the most significant challenges facing cancer patients. “I think a huge piece of addressing the uncertainty felt by cancer patients is advancing their health literacy. When patients are able to monitor their own behaviors, they are able to better understand the correlations between those behaviors and how they are feeling, and even change those behaviors to improve their quality of life.”

The study will last 9 months.

Media contact:
Wendy A. Marano
marano-wendy@cooperhealth.edu
Office: 856.382.6463
Mobile: 856-904-1688

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Cooper Presents “Camden” Sweatshirts to City School Children As Part of Its Commitment to Promote Health and Wellness

SweatshirtsmainOn Monday, November 9, 2015, executives, physicians and nurses from Cooper University Health Care visited H.B. Wilson Elementary School to kick-off a sweatshirt distribution to all Camden students in grades K-8. The event was designed to promote health and wellness and to increase community pride. The specially branded “Camden” sweatshirts were donated by The Cooper Foundation.

George E. Norcross III, Chairman of the Board at Cooper; Susan Bass Levin, President and CEO of the Cooper Foundation; Michael H. Goodman, MD, Cooper’s Chief of the Department of Pediatrics; and

“Cooper has called Camden its home for 128 years,” said Norcross. “We are here today to demonstrate our commitment to the community through this donation.  Cooper provides the most advanced health care in the city and region. Whether it’s a medical emergency or helping to keep children and families healthy, Cooper is here.”

Following the kick-off event, sweatshirts will be distributed to all K-8 grade students in Camden public schools over the next couple of weeks.

Click here to view more photos from this event. 

Media contact:
Wendy A. Marano
marano-wendy@cooperhealth.edu
Office: 856.382.6463
Mobile: 856-904-1688

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Cooper Designated as a Joint Commission-Certified Primary Stroke Center

Cooper University Health Care has earned The Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval® and the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Heart-Check mark for Advanced Certification for Primary Stroke Centers. The Gold Seal of Approval® and the Heart-Check mark represent symbols of quality from their respective organizations.

Cooper Neurological Institute Stroke Program aims to provide the highest standard of care, including diagnosis, prevention and treatment, for patients with stroke and other cerebrovascular diseases. The program underwent a rigorous onsite review in June 2015. The Joint Commission experts evaluated compliance with stroke-related standards and requirements, including program management, the delivery of clinical care and performance improvement.

“Cooper has thoroughly demonstrated the greatest level of commitment to the care of stroke patients through its Advanced Certification for Primary Stroke Centers,” said Michele Sacco, MS, interim executive director of Certification Programs. “We commend Cooper for becoming a leader in stroke care, potentially providing a higher standard of service for stroke patients in its community.”

“We congratulate Cooper for achieving this designation,” said Nancy Brown, chief executive officer of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. “By adhering to this very specific set of treatment guidelines Cooper has clearly made it a priority to deliver high-quality care to all patients affected by stroke.”

“Cooper is pleased to receive advanced certification from The Joint Commission and the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association,” said Ryna K. Then, MD, director of the Inpatient Stroke Program. “The certification provides us with the opportunity to highlight the exceptional stroke care we provide as well as to continually strive to advance our care even further.”

Established in 2003, Advanced Certification for Primary Stroke Centers is awarded for a two-year period to The Joint Commission-accredited acute-care hospitals. The certification was derived from the Brain Attack Coalition’s “Recommendations for the Establishment of Primary Stroke Centers” (JAMA, 2000) and the “Revised and Updated Recommendations for the Establishment of Primary Stroke Centers” (Stroke, 2011).

Stroke is number five in the cause of death and a leading cause of adult disability in the United States, according to the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. On average, someone suffers a stroke every 40 seconds; someone dies of a stroke every four minutes; and 795,000 people suffer a new or recurrent stroke each year.

Media contact:
Wendy A. Marano
marano-wendy@cooperhealth.edu
Office: 856.382.6463
Mobile: 856-904-1688

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